My Works

The Chalmers Race: Ty Cobb, Napoleon Lajoie, and the Controversial 1910 Batting Title that Became a National Obsession
In 1910 auto magnate Hugh Chalmers offered an automobile to the baseball player with the highest batting average that season. What followed was a batting race unlike any before or since, between the game's greatest but most despised hitter, Detroit's Ty Cobb, and the American League's first superstar, Cleveland's popular but aging Napoleon Lajoie. The Chalmers Race captures the excitement of this strange contest--one that has yet to be fully resolved.

--Available Spring 2014--

Eddie Collins: A Baseball Biography
When a short, slender, floppy-eared collegiate infield star from Columbia met Connie Mack, the great manager of the Philadelphia Athletics, in a New York City hotel in 1906 to negotiate a professional baseball contract, few would have predicted greatness for the youngster. Eddie Collins: A Baseball Biography details why over one hundred years later that young man is still regarded by many as the game's greatest second baseman.

Finalist--Larry Ritter Book Award--SABR (2008)

The Sizzler: George Sisler, Baseball’s Forgotten Great
In the 1920s baseball’s hitting giants were Cobb, Ruth, Hornsby and George Sisler. The first three remain part of baseball folklore. Until recently Sisler was essentially forgotten. The Sizzler details Sisler’s rise to fame, his years at the top, and analyzes why his star so quickly dimmed.

Selected Works

Non-Fiction/Biography
A baseball story of dubious scorekeeping and statistical systems, of performances and personalities in conflict, of accurate results revealed seventy years too late, and of a contest settled not by play on the field but by human foibles.
Nonfiction/Biography
The exciting life and times of one of baseball's greatest second basemen while a key member of powerful Philadelphia Athletics and controversial Chicago White Sox teams from 1906-1930 and as an executive with the Boston Red Sox from 1933-1951.
The story of Hall-of-Famer George Sisler, Ty Cobb’s “nearest thing to the perfect ballplayer.”